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Bitter disappointment at lack of ambition | The Wildlife Trusts

Bitter disappointment at lack of ambition | The Wildlife Trusts | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The Wildlife Trusts are bitterly disappointed by the lack of ambition shown in this consultation. Defra proposes to designate only 31 of the 127 sites recommended by experts and stakeholders at the end of August last year.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Defra has ducked the issue.  £8.8M of tax payers money and huge amounts of expert NGO time has been dismissed on the spurious grounds of inadequate evidence.

 

Marine conservation in the Uk is pathetic compared to the bold large scale interventions that are occuring elsewhere in the world.  

 

No vision and poor environmental leadership - not the 'greenest government ever'

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Gordon McGlone's curator insight, December 14, 2012 6:23 AM

Defra is showing NO leadership in this matter.  Our marine heritage is of enormous proportion and this fudged delay puts the UK well behind other nations who understand that doing nothing is not an option.  A partial implementation and an announcement of yet another consultation after huge NGO commitment and £8.8M govt expenditure is hard to understand.

Blue Planet
Our fragile world and its wonderful wildlife
Curated by Gordon McGlone
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BANGLADESH: Report shows poor benefit from commercial aquaculture

BANGLADESH: Report shows poor benefit from commercial aquaculture | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

A new report from WorldFish shows that resource-poor Bangladeshis can participate in commercial aquaculture, challenging conventional assumptions that this was not possible. The report also highlights that more of the very poor in Bangladesh are profiting from commercial aquaculture than was previously thought.

 Aquaculture, employment, poverty, food security and well-being in Bangladesh: A comparative study (http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/AAS-2014-39.pdf), finds that where a critical mass of aquaculture producers had formed in a particular region, the development of related infrastructure reduced costs and lowered barriers to entry for other producers. In those areas, the potential of aquaculture to generate significant returns was sufficiently attractive to make the risks of investing in it appear acceptable to resource-poor households. In the study, more small landowners and resource-poor farmers were shown to practice commercial aquaculture than semi-subsistence forms, for example from household ponds.   The study found greater social and economic benefits in small and medium sized aquaculture enterprises as opposed to smaller scale or household operations. Commercially-oriented aquaculture producers, the report also found, derived nutritional benefit by consuming larger quantities of fish from their own farms than households operating backyard operations. Stephen Hall, Director General, WorldFish: “By identifying the modes of aquaculture that most benefits the poor we can best direct efforts to bolster this sector. While we have seen the detrimental effects of large scale aquaculture for communities it is now clearer that the benefits of smaller scale commercial operations are potentially great in increasing food security and employment.”  Authored by WorldFish’s Ben Belton, Nasib Ahmed and Murshed-e-Jahan the study also found that employment generated by aquaculture is generally higher than for other forms of agriculture, particularly those that are more seasonal, such as rice production. Commercial smallholder operations were found to create the highest levels of direct employment and in a wide range of supporting occupations, for example pond diggers and providers of transport. The study was conducted via an integrated quantative/qualitative survey in six communities with contrasting patterns of aquaculture development. Aquaculture, employment, poverty, food security and well-being in Bangladesh: A comparative study is a product of the CGIAR Research Programs (CRP) on Aquatic Agricultural Systems in which WorldFish participates as well as an output of the EU funded Aquaculture for food security, poverty alleviation and nutrition project. For more information or to request an interview:Contact: Toby Johnson, Senior Media Relations ManagerMobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606Email: t.johnson@cgiar.orgWeb: worldfishcenter.orgPhotography: flickr.com/photos/theworldfishcenter/ About WorldFishWorldFish is an international, nonprofit research organization that harnesses the potential of fisheries and aquaculture to reduce hunger and poverty. Globally, more than one billion poor people obtain most of their animal protein from fish and 800 million depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. WorldFish is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future. About CGIAR

CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partners.

 

 

 


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Sea levels rising faster than previously thought says new study

Sea levels rising faster than previously thought says new study | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Assessment of 600 tidal gauges across the globe suggests a 25% greater acceleration in the rise over the past 20 years

Via Kathy Dowsett
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EVENT: 20 January 2015, Porto Portugal - Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference

EVENT: 20 January 2015, Porto Portugal - Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

Key players from across the maritime sector will come together in Porto on 20th January to share ideas and unlock funding for projects under the Atlantic Maritime Strategy Action Plan.

 

This first annual Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference, jointly organised by the European Commission and the Directorate-General for Maritime Policy of the Portuguese Ministry of Agriculture and Sea, will act as a catalyst for getting joint projects in Atlantic Ocean area off the ground to start delivering the jobs and growth the region needs.

 

Over 400 participants will take part in twenty stakeholder-led workshops on topics covering the entire spectrum of the maritime sector including aquaculture, marine biotech, marine litter, maritime safety, coastal tourism and territorial cooperation in the Atlantic. All of themes reflect the priorities agreed under the Atlantic Action Plan to drive the 'blue economy' forward.

 

The marine and maritime sectors that make up the 'blue economy' have the potential to provide more jobs by 2020. These jobs will be found not only in emerging sectors, such as offshore renewable energy, but also through revitalising traditional maritime industries. The Atlantic area can make a significant contribution to this 'blue growth'.

 

This Action Plan, part of the Commission's Atlantic Strategy, sets out priorities for research and investment to drive the ‘blue economy’ forwards in the Atlantic area. The EU's Atlantic countries will draw on the plan to help create sustainable and inclusive growth in coastal areas.

 

The event will be opened by Mr. Rui Moreira, Mayor of Porto who will speak alongside  Hon. Manuel Pinto de Abreu, Secretary of State for the Sea of the Portuguese Government, Ms Lowri Evans, Director General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries at the European Commission, Mr Emídio Gomes, President of the Regional Development and Coordination Commission of the North Region, and Mr Ricardo Serrão Santos, Member of the European Parliament.

 

More information


Full programme details: http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/sea_basins/atlantic_ocean/atlanticforum/events-2015/porto/index_en.htm

 

EU’s Atlantic Strategy: http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/sea_basins/atlantic_ocean/index_en.htm

 


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England's marine conservation network is worse than useless | Callum Roberts

England's marine conservation network is worse than useless | Callum Roberts | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Callum Roberts: Marine conservation policy has drifted far off its original course – but there is still a way to save our seas

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

UK is a poor performer on the World marine conservation stage.

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Scientists estimate total weight of plastic floating in world's oceans: Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution floating in the ocean

Scientists estimate total weight of plastic floating in world's oceans: Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution floating in the ocean | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
“Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution may be floating in the world's oceans, according to a new study. Microplastic pollution is found in varying concentrations throughout the oceans, but estimates of the global abundance and weight of floating plastics, both micro and macroplastic, lack sufficient data to support them. To better estimate the total number of plastic particles and their weight floating in the world's oceans, scientists from six countries contributed data from 24 expeditions co”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, AimForGood
Gordon McGlone's insight:
We are the only species that wilfully discards materials with no regard for the future. We are unique; we understand what we are doing. We just don't take nature seriously. There will be a pay back but it will be a huge environmental cost not a short term benefit.
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Prime Minister urged to intervene in fishing row

Prime Minister urged to intervene in fishing row | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Prime Minister David Cameron has been urged to intervene amid warnings that a Government decision to close a Westcountry fishery could have 'devastating consequences'.

The Marine Management...
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Dolphin watchers warned - Jersey News from ITV Channel Television

Dolphin watchers warned - Jersey News from ITV Channel Television | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

It follows an incident in Jersey at the weekend when a number of vessels were spotted surrounding a pod of dolphins, and a couple of boats even sailed straight through the group to take a photo.

Gordon McGlone's insight:

The Marine Conservation Society says such behaviour is both irresponsible and against government rules. 

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Ecological coherence made simple!

Ecological coherence made simple! | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

The Wildlife Trusts tell the story of we can help nature to hang together.

Gordon McGlone's insight:

"Working as part of the Joint Links (Wildlife & Countryside Link, Wales Environment Link, Scottish Environment Link and Northern Ireland Marine Task Force) we have recently commissioned a piece of work to examine the concept of ecological coherence against the current and proposed marine protected area network within the UK. This alongside other pieces of work, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Council (JNCC) and PANACHE will be discussed at this week’s Marine and Coastal Policy Forum to be held at Plymouth University within a workshop examining what we mean by ‘ecological coherence’."

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Ocean Conservation: Is the Tide Finally Turning?

Ocean Conservation: Is the Tide Finally Turning? | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
By Ghislaine Maxwell Fish don’t vote; is that perhaps why the ocean and its problems are a low priority for governments and few politicians see a need to have a public opinion on ocean related issues? The ocean and its myriad of problems generally elicit a collective shrug from the general public. You are more…
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Maui’s dolphin faces extinction unless action is taken now

Maui’s dolphin faces extinction unless action is taken now | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The world’s rarest marine dolphin faces imminent extinction unless urgent action is taken to protect them
Gordon McGlone's insight:

No time to waste NZ government please take action:-

"We are down to the last 55 dolphins, so we are calling on our political leaders to let them know it's time to take action to save these precious animals," said New Zealand Executive Director Chris Howe. "At the rate we are going the only place future generations will be able to see Maui's is in museums."

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Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360

Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360 | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Originating in Europe, 'nature-like' fishways are now being constructed on some U.S. rivers where removing dams is not an option. Unlike traditional fish ladders, these passages use a natural approach aimed at significantly increasing once-abundant runs of migratory fish.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Barriers to diadromous fish, which live part of their lives in fresh water and part in salty seas, are strewn across water courses all over the world; most abundantly in long industrialised Europe.  The impacts can be catastrophic - if fish can not complete their breeding cycles they become locally extinct.  Shads are now scarce on the River Wye  in Wales and the Alice Shad may be no more.


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How eels give enemies the slip

How eels give enemies the slip | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The survival of some creatures and plants is ensured by their occasional, and inexplicable, surge in number
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Interesting title but the population dynamics behind the periodic population vagaries of the Atlantic Eel remain a mystery.  2013 was a good year for elvers in Gloucestershire the first for over 30 years.

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Changing Tides in Coastal Waters Protection

Changing Tides in Coastal Waters Protection | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Summary: 
Since the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 brought the ten new Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) into being, there have been some huge changes in the management of the coastal waters around England. In this guest blog Tim Robbins of the Devon & Severn IFCA explains their role and how they are working with Wildlife Trusts on protection of the marine habitats and species.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

QUOTE


"A productive and protected marine environment will be able to provide increased food security as well as employment for local fishermen, increased use of the coastal waters for recreational enjoyment such as angling and diving as well as a thriving marine ecosystem for decades to come."

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Marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction - The Malaysian Insider

Marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction - The Malaysian Insider | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
An important meeting will take place from January 20-23, 2015 at the United Nations (UN) HQ in New York. This is one of a series of meetings of the UN-established…
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The oceans are of fundamental importance at the levels of both the planet and the plate.  Protecting marine biodiversity has major importance at both levels.  

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For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home

For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence.

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The dead leatherback turtle that  I saw washed ashore in #Gloucestershire in the early '90s had probably been feeding in the Bristol Channel approaches before its demise.

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ICELAND: Traditional small boat Icelandic lumpfish fishery is MSC certified

ICELAND: Traditional small boat Icelandic lumpfish fishery is MSC certified | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

The world's first lumpfish fishery achieves MSC certification in Iceland.

 

Iceland’s lumpfish fishery has been MSC certified as a sustainable and well-managed fishery. The 330 small boats are the first MSC certified lumpfish fishery in the world.

 

Lumpfish has been harvested for centuries inside the Icelandic Exclusive Economic Zone. Male and female lumpfish are easily distinguished both in colour and size, where females are larger.

 

The big mesh size gillnets fishery mainly targets the females for their roe, which is exported as a luxury caviar mainly to European countries. There is also a growing Chinese market for the female fish while male lumpfish is less frequently caught, mostly for traditional local consumption.

 

Stable stocks

 

The lumpfish distributed between Iceland and Norway is one of three genetically distinct stocks of lumpfish in the North Atlantic. Although some other lumpfish stocks have faced challenges, the Icelandic lumpfish fisheries have been relatively stable since 1990.

 

The lumpfish fishery is controlled by various measures that include restrictions regarding the number of licenses and nets, a fishing season of three months only as well as limitations on vessel and mesh sizes.

 

Delicate ecosystems

 

Icelandic waters contain a wide range of delicate ecosystems, mostly in deep water. The static bottom-set gillnets used in the lumpfish fishery have minimal contact with these ecosystems as the fishery mainly takes place on a rocky sea bed in shallow waters.

 

The fishery’s main bycatch is the MSC certified cod (Gadus morhua), representing around five per cent of the total catch. All bycatches are landed as discarding is prohibited in Iceland.

 

A world first

 

The client, Vignir G. Jónsson hf., was a family run business founded in 1970 but is now a subsidiary of the seafood company HBGrandi. The headquarters and main processing site of Vignir are in the town of Akranes, with a staff of about 40, but they also operate in east coast of Iceland. Vignir CEO, Mr. Eíríkur Vignisson says: “I’m happy that this assessment is now completed.

 

All lumpfish fisheries in N-Atlantic were last year listed as red by many of the eNGO traffic light systems. That was a huge disappointment for the industry but I hope this certification will contribute to the Icelandic lumpfish products falling under the green category. It is important for the industry to be able to demonstrate to overseas buyers that our products originate from a truly sustainable fishery.”

 

Gisli Gislason, MSC Manager for the North Atlantic said: “Lumpfish roe is an important product for European markets and this is the first lumpfish fishery in the world to get MSC certified. This is the only traditional fishery in Iceland exclusively performed by small vessels.

 

Close cooperation between the authorities and the small boats association is vital to protect the marine environment and ensure lumpfish stocks are stable for the future. MSC certification provides independent reassurance for consumers around the world that the lumpfish roe comes from a sustainable fishery. We hope that this certification will in return incentivise other lumpfish fisheries to enter the MSC program.”

 

More Information

 

For media enquiries, please contact: media@msc.org.


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Well managed independently certified fisheries are critical to the future of marine food supply for this crowded planet.  Lumpfish is a  niche luxury food but the principles of this fishery stock management show that it can work over the long time frame that sustainability requires.

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Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews

Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
“ Oysters are sensitive to increasingly corrosive seawater, and it's causing commercial oyster operations to fail.”
Via Kathy Dowsett
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CHINA: The Biggest ever whale shark slaughterhouse uncovered in southeastern China

CHINA: The Biggest ever whale shark slaughterhouse uncovered in southeastern China | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

HONG KONG, 27 January 2014 – The world's largest slaughtering facility for whale sharks — an internationally-protected endangered species — has been discovered, near Wenzhou, in China’s southeastern Zhejiang Province. The factory, which operates openly, is reportedly slaughtering over 600 whale sharks annually to produce shark oil for health supplements. Revelations about shark-processing at the factory, located in Pu Qi township, near Wenzhou, follow a four-year investigation by the Hong Kong-based conservation NGO, WildLifeRisk.

In a joint-statement released today, Alex Hofford and Paul Hilton of WildLifeRisk said: “We went to Pu Qi three times in the last three years, and on each occasion the scale of the slaughter was truly staggering. “How these harmless creatures, these gentle giants of the deep, can be slaughtered on such an industrial scale is beyond belief. It’s even more incredible that this carnage is all for the sake of non-essential lifestyle props such as lipsticks, face creams, health supplements and shark fin soup. We are calling on China’s regulatory authorities to enforce the international agreements on this illegal activity now, before these animals are brought closer to extinction.” According to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to which China is a signatory, the international sale of products from an endangered species is illegal and the trade is unsustainable.

However, the WildLifeRisk investigation found that countless basking sharks and great white sharks – two of three species currently afforded the highest protection under CITES– are also being industrially processed at the Pu Qi factory.The products derived from these protected species are being exported to the United States, Canada and Italy, in contravention of the internationally-binding CITES agreement.

Undercover footage and audio recordings obtained by WildLifeRisk revealed that the whale sharks ending up at the factory are being caught off the coast of China in the South China Sea as they traverse the region on their migratory journeys. These extensive journeys across the world’s oceans, take in such famous whale shark-spotting sites as the Ningaloo Reef off Australia’s northwest coast, and waters off Indonesia, the Philippines and Mexico.

WildLifeRisk believes a compelling argument exists for the better protection of whale sharks in their natural habitats, maintaining that these endangered creatures are worth far more, in economic terms, alive rather than dead.According to the Pew Environment Group: “In regions where whale sharks are known to aggregate, ecotourism has proven to be an extremely lucrative alternative to fishing. It has been estimated that whale shark tourism, mainly through recreational diving, is worth about US$47.5 million worldwide.” The WildLifeRisk statement pointed out that if whale sharks are to avoid being hunted to extinction, consumers must be persuaded to reject whale shark products, or any other kind of shark-related products. It said that the trade in endangered shark and manta ray products is both environmentally unsustainable and morally unethical. “If we hope to save species such as the whale shark from extinction, we must hold individuals accountable for their violation of international protection laws and demand transparency so that consumers can make informed decisions about the products they buy.”

 

DOWNLOAD THE PHOTOS: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/gyymokdgux39g68/KxgzO6BnL5

 

Follow us on Twitter: Follow @WildLifeRisk


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See stars during National Marine Week - Gordon McGlone

See stars during National Marine Week - Gordon McGlone | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
See stars During The Wildlife Trusts’ National Marine Week (26 Jul – 10 Aug) A shoal of events is on offer to day-trippers and holidaymakers
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The magic of the sea shore - the place where you can come closer to spectacular invertebrates than any where else in the UK.

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Huge 20kg jellyfish spotted off Cornwall coast - Telegraph

Huge 20kg jellyfish spotted off Cornwall coast - Telegraph | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A huge barrel jellyfish makes an appearance in an estuary near St Mawes in Cornwall
Gordon McGlone's insight:

UK waters are extremely rich in jelly fish which in turn attracts the giant Leatherback Turtle.  I saw the remains of the last big turtle to be washed ashore at Longney Gloucestershire; at well over two meters long it was an amazing animal tomsee in what many would assume to be an inland county.

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Double trouble for the Mediterranean Sea: Acidification and warming threaten iconic species

Double trouble for the Mediterranean Sea: Acidification and warming threaten iconic species | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Scientist have finalized their findings about the threat of Mediterranean Sea warming and acidification on key species and ecosystems after a 3.5 year study. They have found that this sea is warming and acidifying at unprecedented rates – the main reason is emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. This increases the CO2 in the atmosphere causing warming of the atmosphere and the ocean as well as acidification of its waters due to uptake of CO2 by surface waters.

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A double whammy for the sea surrounded by land.

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Beautiful 80 foot Fin Whales spotted feeding off Pembrokeshire coast

Beautiful 80 foot Fin Whales spotted feeding off Pembrokeshire coast | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The Celtic Sea has its very own population of ocean giants! In an area of the Celtic Sea midway between Pembrokeshire, Cornwall and Ireland, Welsh marine conservation group Sea Trust came across a...
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The second biggest of the world's animals feeding in local waters!  Fin whales are a spectacular prospect for any cetacean fan. A trip across to Ireland is an more enticing prospect than ever.

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Eight-foot shark caught off north Devon coast

Eight-foot shark caught off north Devon coast | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A shark weighing 450lb (204kg) and stretching to eight feet (2.4m) in length was reeled in by a stunned fisherman less than a mile out to sea
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The best part of this story is that the shark was merely tagged and released.  Too many sharks are caught for 'sport' or soup.  This top predator is in big trouble with implications for food chains worldwide.    However, for a Pollack fisherman he used mighty heavy tackle if a 450 lb shark was reeled in!

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Great Barrier Reef coal port challenged

Great Barrier Reef coal port challenged | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Australian environmentalists have launched a lawsuit against plans to expand a coal port that threatens the Great Barrier Reef, writes Maxine Newlands. The approval came in spite of warnings from UNESCO and marine scientists that the Reef is already 'in danger'.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A legal challenge and accusations of cronyism;  not a great background to this conflict over a World Heritage Site and global biodiversity asset without equal.

As TV pundits would say "There is nothing like the Great Barrier Reef anywhere else on the planet".

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10 GIFs Of Deep-Sea Creatures Encountering A Sub

10 GIFs Of Deep-Sea Creatures Encountering A Sub | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Never-before-seen images from a recent expedition to the ocean floor

Via Kathy Dowsett
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Our Ocean deeps - less studied than the moon - contain mysterious life forms more amazing than Dr Who's props department (sorry Whovians no slight intended).

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