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Bloated whale carcass 'could explode' - Telegraph

Bloated whale carcass 'could explode' - Telegraph | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A dead blue whale is slowly rotting on the beach of the western Newfoundland community of Trout River, Canada, prompting fears that the gases inside the creature will cause it to explode
Gordon McGlone's insight:
I hope that the local inhabitants do not suffer the same long term fate as the story told by Para Handy in his tall tail of the stinking whale and unwisely used explosives.
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Blue Planet
Our fragile world and its wonderful wildlife
Curated by Gordon McGlone
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Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews

Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
“ Oysters are sensitive to increasingly corrosive seawater, and it's causing commercial oyster operations to fail.”
Via Kathy Dowsett
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CHINA: The Biggest ever whale shark slaughterhouse uncovered in southeastern China

CHINA: The Biggest ever whale shark slaughterhouse uncovered in southeastern China | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

HONG KONG, 27 January 2014 – The world's largest slaughtering facility for whale sharks — an internationally-protected endangered species — has been discovered, near Wenzhou, in China’s southeastern Zhejiang Province. The factory, which operates openly, is reportedly slaughtering over 600 whale sharks annually to produce shark oil for health supplements. Revelations about shark-processing at the factory, located in Pu Qi township, near Wenzhou, follow a four-year investigation by the Hong Kong-based conservation NGO, WildLifeRisk.

In a joint-statement released today, Alex Hofford and Paul Hilton of WildLifeRisk said: “We went to Pu Qi three times in the last three years, and on each occasion the scale of the slaughter was truly staggering. “How these harmless creatures, these gentle giants of the deep, can be slaughtered on such an industrial scale is beyond belief. It’s even more incredible that this carnage is all for the sake of non-essential lifestyle props such as lipsticks, face creams, health supplements and shark fin soup. We are calling on China’s regulatory authorities to enforce the international agreements on this illegal activity now, before these animals are brought closer to extinction.” According to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to which China is a signatory, the international sale of products from an endangered species is illegal and the trade is unsustainable.

However, the WildLifeRisk investigation found that countless basking sharks and great white sharks – two of three species currently afforded the highest protection under CITES– are also being industrially processed at the Pu Qi factory.The products derived from these protected species are being exported to the United States, Canada and Italy, in contravention of the internationally-binding CITES agreement.

Undercover footage and audio recordings obtained by WildLifeRisk revealed that the whale sharks ending up at the factory are being caught off the coast of China in the South China Sea as they traverse the region on their migratory journeys. These extensive journeys across the world’s oceans, take in such famous whale shark-spotting sites as the Ningaloo Reef off Australia’s northwest coast, and waters off Indonesia, the Philippines and Mexico.

WildLifeRisk believes a compelling argument exists for the better protection of whale sharks in their natural habitats, maintaining that these endangered creatures are worth far more, in economic terms, alive rather than dead.According to the Pew Environment Group: “In regions where whale sharks are known to aggregate, ecotourism has proven to be an extremely lucrative alternative to fishing. It has been estimated that whale shark tourism, mainly through recreational diving, is worth about US$47.5 million worldwide.” The WildLifeRisk statement pointed out that if whale sharks are to avoid being hunted to extinction, consumers must be persuaded to reject whale shark products, or any other kind of shark-related products. It said that the trade in endangered shark and manta ray products is both environmentally unsustainable and morally unethical. “If we hope to save species such as the whale shark from extinction, we must hold individuals accountable for their violation of international protection laws and demand transparency so that consumers can make informed decisions about the products they buy.”

 

DOWNLOAD THE PHOTOS: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/gyymokdgux39g68/KxgzO6BnL5

 

Follow us on Twitter: Follow @WildLifeRisk


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
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See stars during National Marine Week - Gordon McGlone

See stars during National Marine Week - Gordon McGlone | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
See stars During The Wildlife Trusts’ National Marine Week (26 Jul – 10 Aug) A shoal of events is on offer to day-trippers and holidaymakers
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The magic of the sea shore - the place where you can come closer to spectacular invertebrates than any where else in the UK.

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Huge 20kg jellyfish spotted off Cornwall coast - Telegraph

Huge 20kg jellyfish spotted off Cornwall coast - Telegraph | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A huge barrel jellyfish makes an appearance in an estuary near St Mawes in Cornwall
Gordon McGlone's insight:

UK waters are extremely rich in jelly fish which in turn attracts the giant Leatherback Turtle.  I saw the remains of the last big turtle to be washed ashore at Longney Gloucestershire; at well over two meters long it was an amazing animal tomsee in what many would assume to be an inland county.

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Double trouble for the Mediterranean Sea: Acidification and warming threaten iconic species

Double trouble for the Mediterranean Sea: Acidification and warming threaten iconic species | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Scientist have finalized their findings about the threat of Mediterranean Sea warming and acidification on key species and ecosystems after a 3.5 year study. They have found that this sea is warming and acidifying at unprecedented rates – the main reason is emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. This increases the CO2 in the atmosphere causing warming of the atmosphere and the ocean as well as acidification of its waters due to uptake of CO2 by surface waters.

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A double whammy for the sea surrounded by land.

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Beautiful 80 foot Fin Whales spotted feeding off Pembrokeshire coast

Beautiful 80 foot Fin Whales spotted feeding off Pembrokeshire coast | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The Celtic Sea has its very own population of ocean giants! In an area of the Celtic Sea midway between Pembrokeshire, Cornwall and Ireland, Welsh marine conservation group Sea Trust came across a...
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The second biggest of the world's animals feeding in local waters!  Fin whales are a spectacular prospect for any cetacean fan. A trip across to Ireland is an more enticing prospect than ever.

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Eight-foot shark caught off north Devon coast

Eight-foot shark caught off north Devon coast | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A shark weighing 450lb (204kg) and stretching to eight feet (2.4m) in length was reeled in by a stunned fisherman less than a mile out to sea
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The best part of this story is that the shark was merely tagged and released.  Too many sharks are caught for 'sport' or soup.  This top predator is in big trouble with implications for food chains worldwide.    However, for a Pollack fisherman he used mighty heavy tackle if a 450 lb shark was reeled in!

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Great Barrier Reef coal port challenged

Great Barrier Reef coal port challenged | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Australian environmentalists have launched a lawsuit against plans to expand a coal port that threatens the Great Barrier Reef, writes Maxine Newlands. The approval came in spite of warnings from UNESCO and marine scientists that the Reef is already 'in danger'.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A legal challenge and accusations of cronyism;  not a great background to this conflict over a World Heritage Site and global biodiversity asset without equal.

As TV pundits would say "There is nothing like the Great Barrier Reef anywhere else on the planet".

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10 GIFs Of Deep-Sea Creatures Encountering A Sub

10 GIFs Of Deep-Sea Creatures Encountering A Sub | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Never-before-seen images from a recent expedition to the ocean floor

Via Kathy Dowsett
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Our Ocean deeps - less studied than the moon - contain mysterious life forms more amazing than Dr Who's props department (sorry Whovians no slight intended).

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Report details 99% public support for Scottish marine protected areas - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Report details 99% public support for Scottish marine protected areas - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Plans to create areas of marine protection in Scottish waters have received almost unanimous public support, in a boost for the future of the country's mar
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Only 12 objections out of 14703 responses is a huge vote in support  of marine protected areas for Scotland. England has much to learn as it lags further and further behind international marine conservation programmes.

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Home - Marine Research and Conservation

Home - Marine Research and Conservation | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Underwater marine research and recreational scuba diving, located on the Costa Brava close to the Medes marine reserve.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

"This summer (2014) we are beginning a Seahorse Project which will include a full population survey to assess the current numbers, and the pressures upon them, in a bay where seasonal anchoring is eroding the seagrass meadows. We need experienced scuba divers, marine biology students or graduates, and underwater photograhers to participate."

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UNESCO dumps on Great Barrier Reef dredging decision

UNESCO dumps on Great Barrier Reef dredging decision | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
 In a report released early this morning UNESCO has expressed concern and regret about the Federal Government’s controversial decision to allow dredge spoil dumping on the Great Barrier Reef and the serious decline of the Reef’s health.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The Greet Barrier Reef is a global asset; the only living structure viable from space.  This report is a serious indictment of one government's folly in putting short term economic interests above long term global  marine biodiversity resilience.

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Gordon McGlone's curator insight, May 1, 6:17 AM

No natural leadership here from the  Australian Federal Government.

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Bloated whale carcass 'could explode' - Telegraph

Bloated whale carcass 'could explode' - Telegraph | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A dead blue whale is slowly rotting on the beach of the western Newfoundland community of Trout River, Canada, prompting fears that the gases inside the creature will cause it to explode
Gordon McGlone's insight:
I hope that the local inhabitants do not suffer the same long term fate as the story told by Para Handy in his tall tail of the stinking whale and unwisely used explosives.
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Scientists estimate total weight of plastic floating in world's oceans: Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution floating in the ocean

Scientists estimate total weight of plastic floating in world's oceans: Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution floating in the ocean | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
“Nearly 269,000 tons of plastic pollution may be floating in the world's oceans, according to a new study. Microplastic pollution is found in varying concentrations throughout the oceans, but estimates of the global abundance and weight of floating plastics, both micro and macroplastic, lack sufficient data to support them. To better estimate the total number of plastic particles and their weight floating in the world's oceans, scientists from six countries contributed data from 24 expeditions co”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, AimForGood
Gordon McGlone's insight:
We are the only species that wilfully discards materials with no regard for the future. We are unique; we understand what we are doing. We just don't take nature seriously. There will be a pay back but it will be a huge environmental cost not a short term benefit.
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Prime Minister urged to intervene in fishing row

Prime Minister urged to intervene in fishing row | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Prime Minister David Cameron has been urged to intervene amid warnings that a Government decision to close a Westcountry fishery could have 'devastating consequences'.

The Marine Management...
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Dolphin watchers warned - Jersey News from ITV Channel Television

Dolphin watchers warned - Jersey News from ITV Channel Television | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

It follows an incident in Jersey at the weekend when a number of vessels were spotted surrounding a pod of dolphins, and a couple of boats even sailed straight through the group to take a photo.

Gordon McGlone's insight:

The Marine Conservation Society says such behaviour is both irresponsible and against government rules. 

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Ecological coherence made simple!

Ecological coherence made simple! | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

The Wildlife Trusts tell the story of we can help nature to hang together.

Gordon McGlone's insight:

"Working as part of the Joint Links (Wildlife & Countryside Link, Wales Environment Link, Scottish Environment Link and Northern Ireland Marine Task Force) we have recently commissioned a piece of work to examine the concept of ecological coherence against the current and proposed marine protected area network within the UK. This alongside other pieces of work, carried out by the Joint Nature Conservation Council (JNCC) and PANACHE will be discussed at this week’s Marine and Coastal Policy Forum to be held at Plymouth University within a workshop examining what we mean by ‘ecological coherence’."

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Ocean Conservation: Is the Tide Finally Turning?

Ocean Conservation: Is the Tide Finally Turning? | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
By Ghislaine Maxwell Fish don’t vote; is that perhaps why the ocean and its problems are a low priority for governments and few politicians see a need to have a public opinion on ocean related issues? The ocean and its myriad of problems generally elicit a collective shrug from the general public. You are more…
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Maui’s dolphin faces extinction unless action is taken now

Maui’s dolphin faces extinction unless action is taken now | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The world’s rarest marine dolphin faces imminent extinction unless urgent action is taken to protect them
Gordon McGlone's insight:

No time to waste NZ government please take action:-

"We are down to the last 55 dolphins, so we are calling on our political leaders to let them know it's time to take action to save these precious animals," said New Zealand Executive Director Chris Howe. "At the rate we are going the only place future generations will be able to see Maui's is in museums."

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Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360

Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360 | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Originating in Europe, 'nature-like' fishways are now being constructed on some U.S. rivers where removing dams is not an option. Unlike traditional fish ladders, these passages use a natural approach aimed at significantly increasing once-abundant runs of migratory fish.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Barriers to diadromous fish, which live part of their lives in fresh water and part in salty seas, are strewn across water courses all over the world; most abundantly in long industrialised Europe.  The impacts can be catastrophic - if fish can not complete their breeding cycles they become locally extinct.  Shads are now scarce on the River Wye  in Wales and the Alice Shad may be no more.


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How eels give enemies the slip

How eels give enemies the slip | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The survival of some creatures and plants is ensured by their occasional, and inexplicable, surge in number
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Interesting title but the population dynamics behind the periodic population vagaries of the Atlantic Eel remain a mystery.  2013 was a good year for elvers in Gloucestershire the first for over 30 years.

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Changing Tides in Coastal Waters Protection

Changing Tides in Coastal Waters Protection | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Summary: 
Since the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 brought the ten new Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) into being, there have been some huge changes in the management of the coastal waters around England. In this guest blog Tim Robbins of the Devon & Severn IFCA explains their role and how they are working with Wildlife Trusts on protection of the marine habitats and species.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

QUOTE


"A productive and protected marine environment will be able to provide increased food security as well as employment for local fishermen, increased use of the coastal waters for recreational enjoyment such as angling and diving as well as a thriving marine ecosystem for decades to come."

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Rare goblin shark caught in US

Rare goblin shark caught in US | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Prehistoric-looking pink shark caught in Florida has only been seen a handful of times
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The first sighting for ten years; the Goblin Shark by catch emphasises that we know so little about the oceans that we are plundering and polluting so carelessly.

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Jim Ries's curator insight, May 4, 9:32 PM

This is amazing.  Will your next generation ever be able to see one... alive?

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Dredging fear for rare dockyard fish

Dredging fear for rare dockyard fish | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Dredging may have harmed rare fish in a protected area, say conservationists.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

QUOTE

Steve Hussey of Devon Wildlife Trust said: "The protection must have teeth and these places must be monitored so the protection is meaningful."

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Drug farm equipment helps to conserve seahorses

Drug farm equipment helps to conserve seahorses | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Native seahorses at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth are to benefit from confiscated equipment used to manufacture drugs.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A new spin on sea weed http://bit.ly/1hVB0nk #marine #seahorse #conservation #drugs

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